Monica's favorite gear for
making Pickled Garlic
This canner is a game changer if you do a lot of canning. It quickly heats water without taking up stove space. Use it next to the sink where you can easily fill it, and empty it directly into the sink with the drain spout on the side. It doesn't heat the kitchen either. I LOVE this appliance. It also multitasks for cooking large batches of soups or beverages. (click below for an economical stove-top canner)
This fits into a standard stockpot and will hold 3 pint or 4 half-pint jars. I used this when I was canning 4 half-pint jars of pickled garlic.
Roll garlic cloves in this tube, and the peels will fall right off. So easy!
One pickled garlic recipe fills 4 of these jars. They're a great size for gifts, too.
I use this every time I fill a jar for canning, storage, or gift mixes. It makes the task easy, tidy, and fast.
Dual spouts and a long, hooked handle take the mess out of filling canning jars.
Use this tool to remove bubbles and measure headspace before sealing jars.
Use this to safely transfer jars vertically in and out of boiling water.
These full size sheets work with ink-jet printers. Print a sheet of labels, cut them apart, and adhere them to jars for a polished finishing touch.
Also available: card stock for tags
This punches perfect circles just the right size for cutting the gift tags & jar labels in one quick, easy motion.
These write-on labels are a quick and easy way to label your jars. The labels easily wash off of emptied jars.
This salt is recommended for pickles because it is pure and without additives.

Easy Pickled Garlic | for refrigerating or canning

add to salads, antipasto, sautés, or olive & cheese plates


Pickled Garlic

By Monica              4 half-pint jars
Pickled Garlic has the flavor of garlic without the bite. It is a great addition to salads, antipasto, sautés, olive and cheese plates. Store in the fridge or can it. From TheYummyLife.com

Pickled Garlic has the flavor of garlic without the bite. It is a great addition to salads, antipasto, sautés, or olive and cheese plates. Suitable for fridge storage or canning.

Ingredients
  • 4 cups (approx. 1 lb.) peeled garlic cloves
  • 1-1/4 cup white wine vinegar (or regular white vinegar)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon pickling salt (or kosher salt)
  • ADD TO EACH HALF-PINT JAR:
  • 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1/8 teaspoon whole cumin seeds
  • 1/8 teaspoon whole coriander seeds
  • 1/8 teaspoon whole mustard seeds
  • 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (depending on how much heat is desired)
  • 1/2 bay leaf (use kitchen shears to cut bay leaves in half)

Directions
Wash jars, lids, and rings in hot soapy water.

--In saucepan, combine vinegar, water, and salt; bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and cover until ready to fill jars.
--To bottom of each jar, add peppercorns, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, mustard seeds, red pepper flakes, and bay leaf.
--Fill each jar with garlic cloves, packing them in to fill spaces as much as possible. Fill jars to approx. 1/2" from top. Add hot vinegar mixture to each jar, leaving 1/4" head space. Insert bubble remover down sides of jar in 2 to 3 places to remove trapped bubbles. Tap jars gently on counter to further release bubbles. Top off jars, if necessary, to restore 1/4" head space. Clean jar rims with wet paper towel. Add lid to each jar. Screw on rings just until finger tight.  

FOR REFRIGERATOR PICKLED GARLIC: Allow jars to cool to room temperature and then store in fridge. Allow to marinate at least 3 days before eating. Good for several months.

FOR CANNED PICKLED GARLIC: Process using standard USDA water process canning procedures.
--Fill canner or larger stockpot (with canning rack or basket) with hot water and bring to a boil. There should be enough water to cover the filled jars by at least 1 each.
--Use jar lifter to insert each hot, filled jar vertically down into the hot canning water. Bring the water to a full boil and continue processing the jars in boiling water for 10 minutes.
--Turn off heat, remove lid, and let jars rest in hot water for 5 minutes.
--Use jar lifter to remove jars vertically and rest on towel on counter; leave undisturbed for 12 hours.
----Store in cool, dark place. May be eaten within a few days, but best if allowed to cure for 2-3 weeks.
--Shelf stable for at least 1 year.
--If any jars don't seal, cool and move to refrigerator where they will be good for several months.


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What to do when you have an abundance of leftover garlic? Pickle it! That's how this recipe was born. I'd bought a big ol' bag of peeled garlic cloves to use for cooking an Italian meal for a big party. After the party, I had lots of garlic left that I didn't want to go to waste. Even after I froze a bunch of the garlic for future use (see my post How To Mince and Freeze Garlic), I still had garlic left. The easiest, tastiest way I could figure out to preserve it was to pickle and can it. Boy, am I glad I did. I pickled my first jars of garlic a year ago, and I've loved having them in my pantry and fridge. 

Flavorful garlic without the bite. Eating a raw whole clove of garlic would be way too much for me. But pickling mellows out the extreme bite of garlic while leaving it's essential flavor. The acidic vinegar prolongs the shelf life of the garlic and, at the same time, balances its flavor. 

Here are just a few ways to use pickled garlic:

  • on appetizer platters along with olives, pickles, cheese, etc.
  • either whole or sliced and scattered on salads and antipastos
  • sliced and sautéed with veggies of your choice -- like mushrooms...yum!
  • minced, mixed with olive oil, and used to baste grilled veggies or meat
  • minced and added to a vinaigrette
  • mashed and mixed with butter for an amazing spread for bread or garlic toast
  • mashed and mixed into hummus 
  • stuffed whole inside large, pitted olives
  • with Chinese food (especially noodles); on my Facebook page, a reader shared that pickled garlic is popular in China and common in restaurants there
  • as gifts--something uniquely homemade to take along for a host/hostess gift or to share at a party 

Can them.....or not.  Choose which method you prefer:

  • Refrigerator pickled garlic -- Simply assemble the jars and refrigerate. them. After marinating in the fridge for at least 3 days, they're ready to eat. They'll be good stored in the fridge for several months.
  • Canned pickled garlic -- This recipe is suitable and safe for water-process canning. That means they'll be shelf-stable for at least 1 year. It is so easy to can a small batch of pickled garlic, as you'll see in the step-by-step photos below. Canned pickles may be stored in a dark pantry so they don't take up fridge space and they are easy to gift. 

Printable labels, too. Canned goods make a great gift to have on hand, and pickled garlic makes a particularly unique gift. I've provided printable labels near the end of this post that transform your jars into distinctive gifts. Make them now to have ready for holiday, hostess, teacher, and friend gift-giving. There's nothing more appreciated than a homemade gift.

 

Step-by-step photos for making
Pickled Garlic

Step 1. Assemble the ingredients:

  • bay leaves (cut in half with scissors or kitchen shears)
  • coriander seed
  • cumin seed
  • crushed red pepper
  • mustard seed
  • peppercorns

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  • White wine vinegar is preferred, but you can also use regular white vinegar
  • Pickling or kosher salt-- These 2 salts are pure and without additives. Table salt isn't recommended because it contains additives that can cloud the liquid and degrade the quality of the pickles. (source: The Kitchn)

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  • Garlic--peel it yourself, or buy it already peeled. I bought a big bag of peeled garlic at Costco. 

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Step 2. Peel the garlic (if you didn't buy it peeled). You want whole peeled garlic cloves--don't mash them. Here are 3 options that work for peeling garlic cloves easily while keeping them whole.

  • OPTION 1: Use a mason jar. Place unpeeled garlic cloves inside, screw on the lid and shake it like crazy until the peels fall off. Since the jar is clear, it's easy to stop and check to see when the job is finished.

Garlic_pickled2.jpg

  • OPTION 2: Use a garlic peeler tube. Simply insert a few cloves inside the tube, press with your palm as you roll the tube against the counter, and the peels come right off.

view on Amazon: garlic peeler tube

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  • OPTION 3: Use 2 bowls to shake off the peels. This is a good way to peel larger quantities of garlic cloves at one time. Watch this video see a quick demonstration of this easy method.

Step 3. Combine the vinegar and salt in a saucepan. Bring it to a boil and cook until the salt is dissolved. Cover, lower heat, and keep it warm.

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Below are step-by-step photos that explain how to assemble and can jars of pickled garlic. If you are making refrigerator pickled garlic, simply assemble the jars as described and refrigerate them, skipping the water process canning.

CANNING PICKLED GARLIC (Water Processing)

  • Adhere to canning safety guidelines. It's important to follow the jar preparation and processing recommended by the USDA. If you want more detailed canning information, I recommend the Ball website. They are the ultimate authority, and their site is loaded with detailed information and recipes suited for canning. 
  • For general canning tips, see my previous post,

Step-By-Step Canning Tips

Canning tips

Step 4. Prepare the jars & lids. I use half-pint jars for pickled garlic. Wash the jars in hot sudsy water, rinse and dry them. The jars don't have to be sterilized, since they will be processed for 10 minutes (as per updated canning guidelines from Ball). The washed jars need to be hot when they're filled with the hot vinegar mixture. Keep the jars hot in the canner filled with simmering water. Or, my preference is to put them on a tray in an 180 degree oven to keep them hot until it's time to fill them. I think that's easier that juggling them in and out of hot water right before filling them.

The lids and rings should be washed in hot sudsy water, rinsed and dried. The lids do not have to be kept hot in simmering water according to current canning guidelines. 

Step 5. Add seasonings to the bottom of each jar. Then fill the jar with peeled garlic cloves. Pack them in as compactly as possible, but don't crush them.

Garlic_pickled.jpg

Step 6. Ladle the hot vinegar mixture into the jars, filling them until there is 1/4" headspace.

Step 7. Insert a bubble remover down the side of the jar and pull toward the center to release any bubbles (you can use any long, thin object like a chopstick). Then tap the jar gently on the counter to help release additional trapped bubbles.

Step 8. Measure headspace and add more hot vinegar mixture to restore 1/4" headspace, if necessary.

Step 9. Clean jar rims thoroughly with a wet paper towel. If the rims are dirty the jars won't seal.

Step 10. Add a lid to each jar. Screw on a ring until it is "finger tight".

Garlic_pickled1_1.jpg

For refrigerator pickled garlic, you're done! Let the jars cool to room temperature, then put them in the fridge and let them marinate for a few days (at least 3 days) before eating them. They will keep in the fridge for several months.

For canned pickled garlic, proceed with the following steps:

Step 10. While you're filling the  the jars, get your water boiling. Add water to a water-process canner or large pot (with a rack or basket in the bottom) that is tall enough for the water level to be 1" higher than the jars. Bring water to a boil, cover, and keep hot until jars are ready.

  • In the photos below, I'm using a small-batch canning basket that fits inside a stockpot. It works great for 3 or 4 half-pint jars. For larger batches (up to 12 half-pint jars), I use a full-size electric canner.

Step 11. Use a jar lifter to lower each jar vertically into the canner of boiling water. Make sure there is at least 1" of water over the tops of the jars.  Cover and return water to a rolling boil. Process jars in boiling water for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and remove lid; leave jars in hot water for 5 more minutes. 

Step 12. Use a jar lifter to remove each jar vertically and set on a towel. Leave undisturbed for 12 hours. Within 30 minutes after the jars are removed from the water, you know they've safely sealed if the center of the jar is slightly indented (it shouldn't give when you press it); often you'll hear a popping noise when they seal. If any of your jars don't seal, store them in the fridge and eat them within 2-3 months.

view on Amazon:   

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Store your sealed, processed jars in a cool, dark place (a cabinet or pantry is fine as long as it doesn't get too hot); a basement is ideal. They are shelf stable for at least 1 year.

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For a finishing touch, I like to label my jars. That way they're easy to identify on my shelf, look attractive on the table, and are ready for make-ahead gifts. Grab one of these to take as a unique, homemade gift for a host/hostess, teacher, co-worker, or friend. Print the labels and stick them on the sides or lids of each jar--easy! 

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Download printable jar labels/tags. These are sized to fit on jar lids (regular or wide mouth) or sides.

  • Print these on card stock, cut them out, punch a hole on top, and hang them from the jar neck with a ribbon, string, or rubber band. OR
  • Print them on sticker paper and stick them to the jar or lid. (This is what I do.) Or, print them on regular paper and stick them on with tape.

If you don't have a printer or specialty papers, you can have a store with printing services download and print them for you (Office Depot, Staples, etc.)

Click on the label image below to download & print a full sheet of labels/tags.

Pickled_Garlic_Single_Label_Image_resized.jpg

Cut with scissors or a circle punch. You can cut the round tags out carefully with scissors, or use a circle punch to make the task easier and more precise. I use a 2-1/4" circle punch; it fits both regular and wide canning lids.

view on Amazon:  2-1/4" circle punch (this fits mason jar lids)

IMG_9436.jpg

Write-on labels are an easy option if you don't want to go to the trouble of printing and cutting your own. These ready-made rolls of labels are sized just right for canning jars and they are dissolvable for easy removal when the jar is empty.

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Now all that's left is eating and enjoying these flavorful little morsels.

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Set a bowl of these out with some cheese and crackers for a quick, easy appetizer.

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Include them on a plate with other pickled and marinated goodies like olives, artichoke hearts, pepperoncini, roasted red peppers, baby corn, and mozzarella balls.

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They're also a yummy addition to salads and antipasto platters. Here's my recipe for assembling a gorgeous antipasto: Italian Antipasto Salad Platter.

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If you've never tried pickled garlic, you are in for a treat. I love having these on hand in my pantry and fridge.

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Make it a Yummy day!

Monica

Link directly to this recipe Print this recipe
Pickled Garlic
By Monica              Servings: 4 half-pint jars
Ingredients
  • 4 cups (approx. 1 lb.) peeled garlic cloves
  • 1-1/4 cup white wine vinegar (or regular white vinegar)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon pickling salt (or kosher salt)
  • ADD TO EACH HALF-PINT JAR:
  • 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1/8 teaspoon whole cumin seeds
  • 1/8 teaspoon whole coriander seeds
  • 1/8 teaspoon whole mustard seeds
  • 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (depending on how much heat is desired)
  • 1/2 bay leaf (use kitchen shears to cut bay leaves in half)
Directions
Wash jars, lids, and rings in hot soapy water.

--In saucepan, combine vinegar, water, and salt; bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and cover until ready to fill jars.
--To bottom of each jar, add peppercorns, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, mustard seeds, red pepper flakes, and bay leaf.
--Fill each jar with garlic cloves, packing them in to fill spaces as much as possible. Fill jars to approx. 1/2" from top. Add hot vinegar mixture to each jar, leaving 1/4" head space. Insert bubble remover down sides of jar in 2 to 3 places to remove trapped bubbles. Tap jars gently on counter to further release bubbles. Top off jars, if necessary, to restore 1/4" head space. Clean jar rims with wet paper towel. Add lid to each jar. Screw on rings just until finger tight.  

FOR REFRIGERATOR PICKLED GARLIC: Allow jars to cool to room temperature and then store in fridge. Allow to marinate at least 3 days before eating. Good for several months.

FOR CANNED PICKLED GARLIC: Process using standard USDA water process canning procedures.
--Fill canner or larger stockpot (with canning rack or basket) with hot water and bring to a boil. There should be enough water to cover the filled jars by at least 1 each.
--Use jar lifter to insert each hot, filled jar vertically down into the hot canning water. Bring the water to a full boil and continue processing the jars in boiling water for 10 minutes.
--Turn off heat, remove lid, and let jars rest in hot water for 5 minutes.
--Use jar lifter to remove jars vertically and rest on towel on counter; leave undisturbed for 12 hours.
----Store in cool, dark place. May be eaten within a few days, but best if allowed to cure for 2-3 weeks.
--Shelf stable for at least 1 year.
--If any jars don't seal, cool and move to refrigerator where they will be good for several months.
Print this Recipe   Share this Recipe

Here are more of my recipes that are suitable for water process canning:



Posted on Saturday, August 20th, 2016








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