Monica's favorite gear for
making Pickles
This canner is a game changer if you do a lot of canning. It quickly heats water without taking up stove space. Use it next to the sink where you can easily fill it, and empty it directly into the sink with the drain spout on the side. It doesn't heat the kitchen either. I LOVE this appliance. It also multitasks for cooking large batches of soups or beverages. (click below for an economical stove-top canner)
These regular-mouth pint jars are ideal for pickles. Click below for the wide-mouth version.
Also available: wide-mouth pint jars
I use this every time I fill a jar for canning, storage, or gift mixes. It makes the task easy, tidy, and fast.
Dual spouts and a long, hooked handle take the mess out of filling canning jars.
Use this tool to remove bubbles and measure headspace before sealing jars.
Use this to safely transfer jars vertically in and out of boiling water.
These full size sheets work with ink-jet printers. Print a sheet of labels, cut them apart, and adhere them to jars for a polished finishing touch.
Also available: card stock for tags
This punches perfect circles just the right size for cutting the gift tags & jar labels in one quick, easy motion.
These write-on labels are a quick and easy way to label your jars. The labels easily wash off of emptied jars.
This is an economical multi-tasker. I've used this pot for pickles, jam, pasta, boiling big batches of corn, and more. It's a versatile pot.
For an easy way to achieve crispier pickles, simply add 1/8 teaspoon of this to each jar.
This salt is recommended for pickles because it is pure and without additives.
I use this for combining and soaking the cucumbers, onions, and salt. It's handy for other large mixing and storage batches, too. Click below for the lid.
Also available: lid for container

Best Bread and Butter Pickles

An easy, old fashioned recipe for refrigerater pickles or canning


Bread and Butter Pickles

By Monica              makes 6-7 pints
The Best Bread and Butter Pickles! Grandma's easy, old fashioned recipe that's suitable for refrigerator pickles or canning. Printable labels, too. From TheYummyLife.com

These pickles are the best! This is my Grandma's easy, old fashioned recipe that's suitable for refrigerator pickles or canning.

Ingredients
  • 5 lbs. pickling cucumbers, sliced 1/4" thick (16 cups when sliced)
  • 2 lbs. onions, halves and thinly sliced (6 cups when sliced)
  • 1/3 cup pickling salt (or 1/2 cup kosher salt)
  • 3-1/2 cups vinegar; use white or cider or half-and-half combination
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 10 garlic cloves
  • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons celery seeds
  • 1 teaspoon red chili flakes
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon tumeric
  • optional: 3/4 teaspoon Pickle Crisp granules

Directions
Combine sliced cucumbers, onions, and salt in large bowl; toss to combine; cover and refrigerate for 3-4 hours (or as long as 12 hours). Drain in colander, rinse well under running water for 2 minutes, tossing vegetables as they are rinsing. Drain.  

In 8-quart pot, combine vinegar, sugar, garlic, mustard and celery seeds, pepper flakes, cloves, and tumeric; heat over high heat until boiling. Add cucumber/onion mixture, stir, and return to boil. Turn off heat.

FOR REFRIGERATOR STORAGE, pickles are finished. Transfer the cucumber/onion mixture to lidded jars or containers, cover with hot liquid, and place in refrigerator for at least 24 hours before eating.  Pickles can be stored in the fridge for 2-3 months.

FOR SHELF-STABLE STORAGE, PROCEED WITH WATER PROCESS CANNING:

(Optional: Before filling jars with other ingredients, add 1/8 teaspoon pickle crisp granules to each heated jar.)

Use tongs or a slotted spoon to fill hot pint jars with cucumber/onion mixture, filling to just below where the jar rim begins, pressing down with tongs/spoon to fill in any gaps in jars. Ladle hot vinegar liquid into jars, allowing 1/2 headspace.

Insert chopstick or bubble remover down sides of jars, drawing it towards the center to release any trapped bubbles; refill jars, if necessary, to restore 1/2" headspace. Clean jar rims with wet paper towel. Add lids to each jar; screw on rings just until finger tight.

Bring water to a boil in water process canner, add jars making sure there is at least 1" of water over top of jars. Cover canner, return water to a boil, and process jars for 10 minutes. Remove lid and turn off heat, leaving jars in water for 5 minutes. Use jar lift to remove jars vertically from water and rest on towel undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours.

Store jars in cool dark place. Shelf stable for at least 1 year.


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These crispy Bread and Butter Pickles are the happy marriage of sweet and tangy flavors with zippy spices. This is my favorite pickle recipe and is tried and true through generations in our family. I've been eating these homemade pickles my entire life. I watched my Grandma Ruby make them from her home-grown pickling cucumbers, and my mom, Pat, made them, too. Now it's my turn, and yours!

Fast and easy. These are surprisingly easy to make. They are especially fast to prep as a refrigerator pickle. If you want them to be shelf stable for an extended time, this recipe is also suitable for canning. As canning recipes go, this is one of the simplest. Read on for step-by-step prep and canning instructions. 

Printable labels, too. Canned goods make a great gift to have on hand, and most everyone loves pickles. I've provided printable labels near the end of this post that transform your jars into distinctive gifts. Make them now to have ready for holiday, hostess, teacher, and friend gift-giving. There's nothing more appreciated than a homemade gift.

How did Bread and Butter Pickles get their name? According to Wikipedia, a pair of farmers in the 1920's made these pickles from leftover, undersized cucumbers and bartered them for grocery staples like bread and butter to help them survive through some rough years.

 

Step-by-step photos for making
Bread and Butter Pickles 

Step 1. Assemble the ingredients:

  • Pickling cucumbers--If you don't grow your own, Farmer's Markets are the best places to find fresh pickling cucumbers. I harvested mine from my garden when they were approx. 4.5" long and 1.5" in diameter. 23 cucumbers weighed 5 lbs. Although I prefer for my pickles to be a uniform size, Bread and Butter Pickles can be made from a variety of sizes, too. 

Pickles_BreadandButter1.jpg

  • Pickling or kosher salt-- These 2 salts are pure and without additives. Table salt isn't recommended because it contains additives that can cloud the liquid and degrade the quality of the pickles. (source: The Kitchn)
  • White or cider vinegar--Use either or a combination of the two. I use a half-and-half combo.

view on Amazon:  pickling salt

Pickles_BreadandButter.jpg

  • Pickle Crisp--optional. A smidgeon of this added to each pickle jar results in crispier pickles. It's safe and easy. I add it to all of my pickles.  (view on Amazon:  Pickle Crisp)

pickle_crisp.jpg 

  • sugar
  • spices: celery seed, mustard seed, crushed red pepper flakes, cloves, tumeric
  • onions and garlic

Pickles_BreadandButter2.jpg

Step 2. Wash the cucumbers well, and then cut them into 1/4-inch thick slices using a knife, food processor, or mandoline

Pickles_BreadandButter4.jpg

Step 3. Cut the onions in half, and then into thin slices.

Pickles_BreadandButter3.jpg

Step 4. Add sliced cucumbers, onions, and salt to large (6 qt.) container. Toss them to mix well, cover, and refrigerate at least 3-4 hours. (May be refrigerated as long as 12 hours.)

view on Amazon:  6 qt. plastic container, lid for container

Pickles_BreadandButter5.jpg

Step 5. After the chill time you'll see liquid in the bottom of the container; the salt causes the liquid to release from the cucumbers. (Mine released 2 cups of liquid.) Transfer mixture to a colander and rinse well for 2 minutes, tossing the veggies as they're rinsing. Drain.

Pickles_BreadandButter6.jpg

Step 6. In an 8-10 qt. pot, combine vinegar, sugar, garlic, mustard and celery seeds, pepper flakes, cloves, and tumeric. Heat over high heat until boiling. Add the cucumber/onion mixture, stir, and return to a boil, and then turn off the heat.

view on Amazon:  8 qt stainless steel pot, 10 qt stainless steel pot

Pickles_BreadandButter7.jpg

For refrigerator pickles--you are done! Transfer the cucumber/onion mixture to jars or containers, fill with hot liquid (enough to immerse the pickle mixture), cover, and place in refrigerator for at least 24 hours before eating.  Pickles can be stored in the fridge for 2-3 months.

For canned pickles--below are step-by-step photos that explain how to can them.

CANNING PICKLES (Water Processing)

  • Adhere to canning safety guidelines. It's important to follow the jar preparation and processing recommended by the USDA. If you want more detailed canning information, I recommend the Ball website. They are the ultimate authority, and their site is loaded with detailed information and recipes suited for canning. 
  • For general canning tips, see my previous post,

Step-By-Step Canning Tips

Canning tips

1. Prepare the jars & lids. I use pint jars for pickles. Wash the jars in hot sudsy water, rinse and dry them. The jars don't have to be sterilized, since they will be processed for 10 minutes (as per updated canning guidelines from Ball). The washed jars need to be hot when they're filled with the hot pickle mixture. Keep the jars hot in the canner filled with simmering water. Or, my preference is to put them on a tray in an 180 degree oven to keep them hot until it's time to fill them. I think that's easier that juggling them in and out of hot water right before filling them.

The lids and rings should be washed in hot sudsy water, rinsed and dried. The lids do not have to be kept hot in simmering water according to current canning guidelines. 

2. Fill the jars. If using Pickle Crisp (optional), add 1/8 teaspoon to the bottom of each jar. Use a canning funnel and tongs to fill each hot jar with pickle mixture; using tongs to press down on mixture to remove gaps. Ladle hot vinegar liquid into jars, covering pickle mixture, and leaving 1/2" headspace. 

3. Insert a bubble remover down the side of the jar and pull toward the center to release any bubbles (you can use any long, thin object like a chopstick).

4. Measure headspace and add more hot vinegar mixture to restore 1/2" headspace, if necessary.

5. Clean jar rims thoroughly with a wet paper towel. If the rims are dirty the jars won't seal.

6. Add a lid to each jar. Screw on a ring until it is "finger tight".

Pickles_BreadandButter8.jpg

7. Use a jar lifter to lower each jar vertically into the canner of boiling water. There should be at least 1" of water over the tops of the jars.  Cover and return water to a rolling boil. Process jars in boiling water for 15 minutes. Turn off heat and remove lid; leave jars in hot water for 5 more minutes. (I'm using the Ball Electric Canner in these photos.)

8. Use a jar lifter to remove each jar vertically and set on a towel. Leave undisturbed for 12 hours. Within 30 minutes after the jars are removed from the water, you know they've safely sealed if the center of the jar is slightly indented (it shouldn't give when you press it); often you'll hear a popping noise when they seal. If any of your jars don't seal, store them in the fridge and eat them within 2-3 months.

view on Amazon:   

Pickles_BreadandButter9.jpg

Store your sealed, processed jars in a cool, dark place (a cabinet or pantry is fine as long as it doesn't get too hot); a basement is ideal. 

IMG_9355.jpg

IMG_9370.jpg

For a finishing touch, I like to label my jars. That way they're easy to identify on my shelf, look attractive on the table, and are ready for gift giving, too. Pickles are universally loved and fun to share. Going to a party? Grab one of these to take as a perfect host/hostess gift. Need a little something for a teacher, co-worker, or neighbor? You can't go wrong with a jar of pickles. Print the labels and stick them on the sides or lids of each jar--easy!

IMG_9383.jpg

Download printable jar labels/tags. These are sized to fit on jar lids (regular or wide mouth) or sides.

  • Print these on card stock, cut them out, punch a on top, and hang them from the jar neck with a ribbon, string, or rubber band. OR
  • Print them on sticker paper and stick them to the jar or lid. (This is what I do.) Or, print them on regular paper and stick them on with tape.

If you don't have a printer or specialty papers, you can have a store with printing services download and print them for you (Office Depot, Staples, etc.)

Click on the label image below to download & print a full sheet of labels/tags.

Bread_Butter_single_lable.jpg

Cut with scissors or a circle punch. You can cut the round tags out carefully with scissors, or use a circle punch to make the task easier and more precise. I use a 2-1/4" circle punch; it fits both regular and wide canning lids.

view on Amazon:  2-1/4" circle punch (this fits mason jar lids)

IMG_9385.jpg

Write-on labels are an easy option if you don't want to go to the trouble of printing and cutting your own. These ready-made rolls of labels are sized just right for canning jars and they are dissolvable for easy removal when the jar is empty.

IMG_9308.jpg

These crispy, flavorful pickles are great in sandwiches or on the side. One bite takes me back to my Grandma Ruby's kitchen. She was a good country cook whose recipes never fail. I hope you like this one as much as I do!

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Make it a Yummy day!

Monica

Link directly to this recipe Print this recipe
Bread and Butter Pickles
By Monica              Servings: makes 6-7 pints
Ingredients
  • 5 lbs. pickling cucumbers, sliced 1/4" thick (16 cups when sliced)
  • 2 lbs. onions, halves and thinly sliced (6 cups when sliced)
  • 1/3 cup pickling salt (or 1/2 cup kosher salt)
  • 3-1/2 cups vinegar; use white or cider or half-and-half combination
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 10 garlic cloves
  • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons celery seeds
  • 1 teaspoon red chili flakes
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon tumeric
  • optional: 3/4 teaspoon Pickle Crisp granules
Directions
Combine sliced cucumbers, onions, and salt in large bowl; toss to combine; cover and refrigerate for 3-4 hours (or as long as 12 hours). Drain in colander, rinse well under running water for 2 minutes, tossing vegetables as they are rinsing. Drain.  

In 8-quart pot, combine vinegar, sugar, garlic, mustard and celery seeds, pepper flakes, cloves, and tumeric; heat over high heat until boiling. Add cucumber/onion mixture, stir, and return to boil. Turn off heat.

FOR REFRIGERATOR STORAGE, pickles are finished. Transfer the cucumber/onion mixture to lidded jars or containers, cover with hot liquid, and place in refrigerator for at least 24 hours before eating.  Pickles can be stored in the fridge for 2-3 months.

FOR SHELF-STABLE STORAGE, PROCEED WITH WATER PROCESS CANNING:

(Optional: Before filling jars with other ingredients, add 1/8 teaspoon pickle crisp granules to each heated jar.)

Use tongs or a slotted spoon to fill hot pint jars with cucumber/onion mixture, filling to just below where the jar rim begins, pressing down with tongs/spoon to fill in any gaps in jars. Ladle hot vinegar liquid into jars, allowing 1/2 headspace.

Insert chopstick or bubble remover down sides of jars, drawing it towards the center to release any trapped bubbles; refill jars, if necessary, to restore 1/2" headspace. Clean jar rims with wet paper towel. Add lids to each jar; screw on rings just until finger tight.

Bring water to a boil in water process canner, add jars making sure there is at least 1" of water over top of jars. Cover canner, return water to a boil, and process jars for 10 minutes. Remove lid and turn off heat, leaving jars in water for 5 minutes. Use jar lift to remove jars vertically from water and rest on towel undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours.

Store jars in cool dark place. Shelf stable for at least 1 year.
Print this Recipe   Share this Recipe

Here are more of my recipes that are suitable for water process canning:




Posted on Thursday, June 23rd, 2016








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